Volume 8, Issue 2, March 2019, Page: 46-56
Assessment of Types of Dating Violence and Gender Prompting Involved in Dating Violence Among Undergraduate Students of University of Maiduguri
Nuhu Robert Kirtani, Department of Physical and Health Education, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Bulus Tikon, Department of Physical and Health Education, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Nashion Hananiah Likki, Department of Physical and Health Education, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Received: Jan. 12, 2019;       Accepted: Mar. 7, 2019;       Published: Apr. 9, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.edu.20190802.12      View  93      Downloads  28
Abstract
The study assessed types of dating violence and gender prompting involved in dating violence among undergraduate students of university of Maiduguri, Borno state, Nigeria. Dating violence is a serious and prevalent public health problem that is associated with numerous negative physical and psychological health outcomes. There is limited research on prevention and intervention strategies to address the issue of dating violence. The development and evaluation of evidence-based programs targeted at dating violence prevention is very important. The study used a descriptive research design. Three hundred and eighty-four (384) copies of questionnaires were administered but three hundred and fifty-six (356) copies were retrieved, making 93% return rate. The analysis of the data collected was done using descriptive statistics (charts, frequency counts and percentages). The result of the study revealed that emotional abuse, psychological abuse, physical abuse and controlling behavior were the types of dating violence in the study area. Ridiculing or insulting women/men as a group, mocking women/men in general, believes that the opposite sex is inferior, making fun of one or discredit one as a women/man and unjustly, criticizing one sexuality by one’s friends were the gender prompting involved in dating violence among undergraduate students of university of Maiduguri Borno State. The researchers recommended that safe date’s program should be added to preexisting curriculum to educate undergraduate students about the effect of dating violence.
Keywords
Gender, Dating Violence, Undergraduate Students
To cite this article
Nuhu Robert Kirtani, Bulus Tikon, Nashion Hananiah Likki, Assessment of Types of Dating Violence and Gender Prompting Involved in Dating Violence Among Undergraduate Students of University of Maiduguri, Education Journal. Vol. 8, No. 2, 2019, pp. 46-56. doi: 10.11648/j.edu.20190802.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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